Notification
Tommy le Baker
Show :
Brand's Logo
More Details
Brand's Logo
More Details
Brand's Logo
Tommy le Baker
/
This week I took some time off to visit the world’s biggest bakery and confectionery trade fair. This trade-show happens once every 3 years in Munich, Germany. So one can imagine is where the “who’s-who” of the baking industry would turn up to present their latest innovations and technologies from baking facilities to ingredients to their world’s biggest potential clients and peers. So here comes me, a small fly from Kampung Attap TLB, who bought his own ticket and went Jalan Jalan in this big ass show! I know I’m not a target audience for such a trade show but anyway I need to update my knowledge on bread, the kind of additives laden bread in all its categories that are continuing being engineered, manufactured and fed to the world A world today who has screamed of inconveniences in consuming the world’s first processed food. I met sales engineers who design, build and sell robots and automation belts to prepackaged bread and cakes pre-mixes. Latest technologies in convenient store bread, chain bakeries and frozen baked goods to bread serve in a plane. Constant sales arguments on costs, efficiency, shelf-life and supply chains. How to make the bread we buy last long long time without getting bad, and, soft and moist long long time without getting dry. This was and still is one of the biggest challenges in this industry. Why? Because consumers have changed in the way they eat and live. And is only by default (except me ah) that the industry meets consumer’s preferences. But unfortunately, not many has looked into the side effects we face with bread today. #convenientstorebread #iba2018
More Details
Advertisement /
Brand's Logo
More Details
Brand's Logo
More Details
Brand's Logo
Tommy le Baker
/
When is found everywhere it must be worth to know more about it... Name: Riisipiirakka Original name and story: The karjalanpiirakka is a small, open, filled pastry with a thin, crispy crust, and between 7-20 cm in length. It is usually oval shaped, but can also be round. The crust usually makes up about a third of the entire product and the filling accounts for about two-thirds. The production of karjalanpiirakka starts by cooking the filling, which is usually a purée of barley, rice or mashed potato; however other mashed vegetables (e.g. swede or rutabaga, carrot, turnip, stewed cabbage or mushrooms) may also be used. When prepared with rice or barley, the grains are first boiled in milk. The dough for the crust is made from water, salt and rye or wheat flour. The dough is rolled as thin as possible, almost translucent, into round shapes (called piirakka). The thinness ensures a crispy crust for the karjalanpiirakka. The edges of the dough are brought up over the filling and crimped. The pie can be coated in butter, oil, milk, water or an egg wash before baking. The piirakka is then placed into a hot oven (about 250-300 °C) for 15-20 minutes. The rapid baking time and high heat are necessary to ensure the pie does not dry out. Filled savory pies like this are common in this part of the world. The open, oval shaped karjalanpiirakka has its origins in Karelia, a historical region now divided between Finland and Russia. The first written reference to karjalanpiirakka dates back to 1686. The dish originally spread during the 1600s and 1700s to southern Finland and even into Sweden through Karelian migrants. During and following World War II, approximately 420,000 Karelians evacuated to mainland Finland, bringing their food culture with them. Today, it is still made both for home consumption and commercial sale. However, traditional home baking is decreasing, as the baking process has many stages and is time consuming. Similar, industrial produced pies called riisipiirakka (rice pastry) threaten to take the place of the traditional karjalanpiirakka. https://www.fondazioneslowfood.com/en/ark-of-taste-slow-food/karelian-pastry/ @ Arctic City Hotel
More Details
Brand's Logo
More Details
Brand's Logo
Tommy le Baker
/
The first bread I learnt to bake was the recipe called “Le Pain Courant” (The Daily Bread). The Ingredients of Recipe were: 1 Farine Panifiable (Bread-making-abled flour) 2 Water. 3 Salt 4 Fresh Yeast 5 Ameliorant de pain (Bread Improver) Because of my language acquisition, and precision of french word employment, I would naturally be captured by the technicality of the words in the recipe. “Farine Panifiable”; naturally I would think is a flour that has been conditioned to make bread. “Ameliorant de pain”; something to improve the bread... I did ask my trainer, what is “ameliorant de pain”? His answer, a typical french boulanger was, IS A BAKER’S INSURANCE. To ensure what? I wondered. And one day i had a chance to work in an “Ameliorant” company and I was selling bread additives. The sales argument was “consistency”. For decades and generations, many baker’s fear was inconsistency in their baked goods hence the dependency of baking aids and improvers. To expand my knowledge on the field inwhich I am interested, Food Safety, I read a lot and extensively. Here is an extract of one publication written in February 1956 by The Food Protection Committee of the Food Nutrition Board, Washington D.C. (Some of the intentional additives mentioned in the report have been banned). Wheat flour, in its natural, freshly milled state, has a yellowish tint due to the presence of small quantities of carotenoid and other natural pigments. when such flour is stored it slowly becomes whiter and undergoes an aging process involving reactions with oxygen of the air which causes it to yield a satisfactorily elastic, stable dough of enhanced breadmaking quality. Until about 40 years ago it was necessary for the miller to age flour so that the baker could produce the type of loaf demanded by the consuming public. It was then discovered that certain oxidising agents incorporated into flour in very small amount would bring about rapid improvement in its colour and breadmaking properties, thereby lessening the storage costs and the hazards of spoilage and infestation with insects and rodents associated with long storage. Some of the permissible agents, such as the oxides of nitrogen and benzoyl peroxide, exert only a bleaching action and are without influence on baking properties. Others, such as chlorine dioxide, nitrosyl chloride, and chlorine, have both bleaching and maturing or improving properties. Potassium bromate has only a maturing effect. The maturing of flour is of much greater economic and practical significance than bleaching, which is practiced today chiefly because of the consumer preference for bread with creamy-white crumb. The flour milled from some threats requires very little oxidation, while that milled from wheat pf different varieties, or grown in other areas or in different crop years, may require substantially more oxidation to yield dough of satisfactory handling properties for mechanised baking and to produce bread of consistently goof quality. The maturing and bleaching agents help to smooth out the wide variations encountered in bread wheats and enable the miller to produce a standard and relatively uniform product. Bread improvers employed by the baking industry contain a small amount if a solid oxidising substance, e.g., potassium bromate , potassium iodate and calcium peroxide, and inorganic salts such as ammonium chloride, ammonium sulphate, calcium sulphate, sodium chloride, mono or diammonium phosphate, and mono-, di-, or tricalcium phosphates which serve as yeast foods and dough conditioners. Their use helps assure vigorous and even fermentation of the dough and enable the baker to produce bread of uniform quality. The use of maturing agents and oxidising improvers is of great economic value. It eliminates the costs and hazards associated with natural ageing and enables the baker to produce uniform baked goods with flour from new-crop wheat as soon as it is available. The widespread acceptance of these agents is illustrated by the fact that most of the bread and cake flours produced today are treated by the mills to improve their baking performance. In the production of quality cakes, highly refined, finely and uniformly granulated flour made from specially selected low protein wheat is required. This flour is bleached and matured with chlorine to produce tender cakes with colour, volume, and fine grain demanded by the consuming public. The quantities of these oxidising agents required to obtain the desired improvement in baking performance are small, and if more than one is used, correspondingly less off each agent is necessary. Excessive treatment gives inferior baked products; thus the treatment is self-limiting. Oh yes...the training institution where I was, is owned the miller.
More Details
Advertisement /
Brand's Logo
More Details
Advertisement /
Show by :
Newest first
Starting soon
Ending soon

Start typing